Inferential and Perceptual Influences of Affective Expectations on Judgments of Experienced Affect

Ian Handley, Montana State University
Dolores Albarracin, University of Florida
Rick Brown, University of Florida
Hong Li, Ece Kumkale, University of Florida, University of Florida
Two experiments investigated novel predictions about inferential and perceptual processes in the domain of affective expectations and experiences with a product. Inferential processes occur when individuals have a naive theory on which to base their inferences, whereas perceptual processes occur without this theory. Both processes yielded an “ironic” effect such that instilling a negative affective expectation resulted in more positive judgments of affect than instilling a positive one. As predicted, this effect occurred when individuals attended to their experienced affect, a condition more readily met in inferential processes. Implications for consumer affect, attitudes, and intentions are discussed.
[ to cite ]:
Ian Handley, Dolores Albarracin, Rick Brown, and Hong Li, Ece Kumkale (2007) ,"Inferential and Perceptual Influences of Affective Expectations on Judgments of Experienced Affect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 464-470.