Non Random Attrition in Health Prevention Programs: a Meta-Analysis of Retention in Hiv Prevention Interventions

Kenji Noguchi, University of Florida, USA
Dolores Albarracin, University of Florida, USA
Marta Durantini, University of Florida, USA
Laura Glasman, Allison Earl, University of Florida, USA, University of Florida, USA
This meta-analysis examined effects of individual differences of prior knowledge, motivation, and behavior on retention in HIV-prevention interventions. The results indicated that people who have high knowledge, have high motivation to use condoms, or are high condom use are less likely to stay in the intervention than those who are low on these aspects. Moreover, low knowledge individuals stayed more than high knowledge individuals when the intervention was informational. Low motivation individuals stayed more than high motivation individuals when the intervention was motivational. Nonetheless, high condom users stayed more than low condom users when the intervention surrounded behavioral-skills training.
[ to cite ]:
Kenji Noguchi, Dolores Albarracin, Marta Durantini, and Laura Glasman, Allison Earl (2007) ,"Non Random Attrition in Health Prevention Programs: a Meta-Analysis of Retention in Hiv Prevention Interventions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 444-445.