Believing That One Is Strong As a Defensive Weakness: Using Defensive Confidence to Attract Reluctant Audiences

Dolores Albarracin, Univeristy of Florida, USA
Amy L. Mitchell, Univeristy of Florida, USA
Marta R. Durantini, Univeristy of Florida, USA
Allison Earl, Justin Levitt, Joanne Gunnoe, Univeristy of Florida, USA, Univeristy of Florida, USA, Alachua County Health Department
A series of studies identified individuals who chronically believe that they can successfully defend their attitudes from external attack. As a result, they seek out counter-attitudinal information and are ultimately persuaded by it. Of course, from the point of view of the recipient, the resulting persuasion is undesirable. From the point of view of the persuader, however, this outcome is highly favorable. In our discussion of research demonstrating these effects, we present findings from laboratory studies as well as correlational and experimental field studies. We review ways of using defensive confidence to attract audiences that are reluctant to use condoms for HIV-prevention.
[ to cite ]:
Dolores Albarracin, Amy L. Mitchell, Marta R. Durantini, and Allison Earl, Justin Levitt, Joanne Gunnoe (2007) ,"Believing That One Is Strong As a Defensive Weakness: Using Defensive Confidence to Attract Reluctant Audiences", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 443-445.