Attachment Style, Psychological Security, and Consumer Response to Special Possession Loss

Rosellina Ferraro, University of Maryland
Jennifer Escalas, Vanderbilt University
James R. Bettman, Duke University
We examine how consumers respond to the psychological security threat from loss of a special possession. Based upon Hart, Shaver, and Goldenberg’s (2005) tripartite security system, we argue that consumer attachment tendencies, that is, the extent to which a person uses possessions to define and communicate the self, affect such responses. Our research shows that people generally become less attached to possessions after a loss. However, the extent of distancing depends on their consumer attachment tendencies. Specifically, people generally low on attachment tendency devalue their remaining possessions more than do people high in attachment tendency.
[ to cite ]:
Rosellina Ferraro, Jennifer Escalas, and James R. Bettman (2007) ,"Attachment Style, Psychological Security, and Consumer Response to Special Possession Loss", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 542-545.