I Wasn’T Myself When I Chose That: Identity-Salience Fluctuations and Post-Choice (Dis)Satisfaction

Robyn LeBoeuf, University of Florida
Julia Belyavsky, University of Florida
We propose that fluctuations in the salience of people’s social identities have consequences for preferences, and, specifically, for post-choice satisfaction. In our studies, participants make choices while one identity is salient; we then ask them to re-evaluate those choices after either the same identity or a conflicting identity is elicited. Dissatisfaction with prior choices is greater when a conflicting identity is evoked (compared to when the initial identity is re-elicited). Furthermore, consumers are more likely to “undo” prior choices when a competing, rather than compatible, identity is later evoked. Identity-salience fluctuations thus affect consumer satisfaction with prior choices.
[ to cite ]:
Robyn LeBoeuf and Julia Belyavsky (2007) ,"I Wasn’T Myself When I Chose That: Identity-Salience Fluctuations and Post-Choice (Dis)Satisfaction", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 541-545.