Consumer Response to Marketplace Deception: Implication of the Persuasion Knowledge Model

Guang-Xin Xie, Department of Marketing, University of Oregon, U.S.A
David, M. Boush, Department of Marketing, University of Oregon, U.S.A
Courtney, N. Boerstler, Department of Marketing, University of Oregon, U.S.A
Consumers can actively cope with marketplace deception with specific motives, knowledge, and expectances. Building upon the Persuasion Knowledge Model (PKM), we propose that consumers’ attitude toward deceptive advertisement differs in response to both situational factors and individual differences. This study examines the effect of deception knowledge on perceived deceptiveness and consumers’ attitude toward deceptive advertisement in high and low stake situations. The results suggest that deception knowledge makes consumers more skeptical toward advertisement, but does not affect their attitude. It is perceived deceptiveness that directly influences attitude, and the effect is greater in high than in low stake situations. Further, individuals’ cognitive optimism moderates the effect of perceived deceptiveness on attitude.
[ to cite ]:
Guang-Xin Xie, David, M. Boush, and Courtney, N. Boerstler (2007) ,"Consumer Response to Marketplace Deception: Implication of the Persuasion Knowledge Model", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 406-410.