Racial Stereotypes in Consumer Judgment: the Effect of the Presence of Others

David Faro, London Business School, UK
Ann McGill, University of Chicago, USA
We examine how social context affects the influence of racial stereotypes in evaluations of services. Findings reveal opposing effects depending on individual differences in self-monitoring. The first study shows that high self-monitors evaluated a financial service provided by an African-American more favorably in public than in private but this pattern was reversed for the low self-monitors. The second study shows that there were no differences in the activation level of the stereotype for the high and low self-monitors, suggesting that the result are driven by differences in participants’ ability and motivation to control the activated stereotype when evaluating the service.
[ to cite ]:
David Faro and Ann McGill (2007) ,"Racial Stereotypes in Consumer Judgment: the Effect of the Presence of Others", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 649-650.