The Effect of Discounting the Influence of Sources of Information on Choice and Product Perceptions

Francine Espinoza, University of Maryland, U.S.A.
Rebecca Hamilton, University of Maryland, U.S.A.
We propose that consumers react differently to the same message depending on whether it is delivered by a salesperson or a friend: consumers are more likely to resist the persuasion of a salesperson than the persuasion of a friend. However, when consumers are instructed to correct their judgments, this pattern reverses. As predicted, participants tend to choose the product that was not recommended by the salesperson. When they are instructed to correct, however, there is no difference in their willingness to purchase the recommended and the non-recommended products. The opposite pattern is observed when a friend is recommending the product.
[ to cite ]:
Francine Espinoza and Rebecca Hamilton (2007) ,"The Effect of Discounting the Influence of Sources of Information on Choice and Product Perceptions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 395-397.