When Does Culture Matter? Effects of Personal Knowledge on the Correction of Culture-Based Judgments.

Donnel Briley, University of Sydney, Australia
Jennifer Aaker, Stanford, US
The debate in international marketing between proponents of globalization versus adaptation turns on the issue of whether consumers in different countries are alike in their preferences and decision tendencies. Rather than debating the general presence or absence of cultural differences, the current research focuses on when cultural influence occurs. The present research suggests that culture does not exert a constant, unwavering effect on consumer judgments. A key factor in determining whether culture-based effects loom large or fade, according to this research, is the extent to which cultural versus more personal knowledge is drawn upon when forming judgments. It is shown that these knowledge types contribute differentially to judgments depending on whether information is processed in a cursory, spontaneous manner versus a thoughtful, deliberative manner.
[ to cite ]:
Donnel Briley and Jennifer Aaker (2007) ,"When Does Culture Matter? Effects of Personal Knowledge on the Correction of Culture-Based Judgments.", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 147-162.