The Impact of Culture Orientation on Consumption Impulsiveness and Beer Consumption

Yinlong Zhang, University of Texas at San Antonio, U.S.A
L.J. Shrum, University of Texas at San Antonio, U.S.A
We propose there is a systematic impact of individualism (versus collectivism) culture orientation and consumers’ independent self-construal (versus interdependent) on their beer consumption tendency. We test this hypothesis using a cross-country comparison of beer consumption data for countries varying on individualism versus collectivism culture orientation (Study 1a), a within U.S. cross-state comparison of beer consumption tendency data for states varying on individualism versus collectivism culture orientation (Study 1b), an experiment by priming self-construal (Study 2), and an experiment by priming self-construal and manipulating the presence of close others (Study 3). Convergent results show that consumers with an independent self-construal tend to have more positive attitudes toward drinking beer and likely to consume more beer. Conversely, consumers with an interdependent self-construal tend to have less positive attitudes toward drinking beer and likely to consume less beer. Further, this effect is more pronounced when close others are present than they are absent. Mediation analyses show that the effect of self-construal operates through consumption impulsivity, rather than risk attitude or affect associated with activated self-construal.
[ to cite ]:
Yinlong Zhang and L.J. Shrum (2007) ,"The Impact of Culture Orientation on Consumption Impulsiveness and Beer Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 370-373.