Circles, Squares, and Choice: Graphical Priming Effects on Uniqueness and Variety Seeking

Michal Maimaran, Stanford University, USA
S. Christian Wheeler, Stanford University, USA
In this research, we propose that individuals spontaneously extract abstract concepts from novel stimuli - arrays of geometrical shapes - and show that exposure to such stimuli alters choice without awareness. Study 1 shows that exposure to “uniqueness” arrays (e.g., one circle among five squares) increases the cognitive accessibility of the uniqueness concept, compared to exposure to “homogeneity” arrays (arrays of identical shapes). Study 2 shows increased choice of unique objects among those primed with “uniqueness” arrays. Study 3 shows greater variety seeking among those primed with “variety” arrays (arrays of differing shapes), than among those primed with “homogeneity” arrays.
[ to cite ]:
Michal Maimaran and S. Christian Wheeler (2007) ,"Circles, Squares, and Choice: Graphical Priming Effects on Uniqueness and Variety Seeking", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 583-585.