Food For Thought: Role of Counterfactual Thinking in the Interpretation of Health Claims and Nutrition Information

Khaled Aboulnasr, Florida Gulf Coast, University, USA
Anu Sivaraman, University of Delaware, USA
The prevalence of obesity is rising in the United States. This trend is largely driven by a sedentary lifestyle, poor diet and inferior nutrition choices. Given the importance of the topic to policy makers and marketers, how consumers interpret claims and nutrition labels on food packages has been the focus of a growing body of literature. In contrast to prior studies reporting that health claims have minimal influence on attitudes and intentions, we hypothesize that counterfactual thinking may intensify a positive effect of health claims on nutrition attitudes. Furthermore, we argue that such effect is affected by the alignment of nutrition information to health claim.
[ to cite ]:
Khaled Aboulnasr and Anu Sivaraman (2007) ,"Food For Thought: Role of Counterfactual Thinking in the Interpretation of Health Claims and Nutrition Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 360-363.