The Effects of Product Scandals on Parent Brands: Linguistic Signatures of a Protective Mechanism

Ernst Primosch, Henkel, Germany
Simon Ineichen, University of Basel
Arnd Florack, University of Basel
We examined whether in case of a scandal, strong parent brands are protected against taking damage by an attribution that is particularly situational. Participants received information about a scandal, around a product brand that was either associated with a strong or a weak parent brand. The language participants used for retelling the scandal was less abstract for the strong parent brand, indicating a different, more situational attribution of the product’s poor performance. This resulted in significantly less negative feedback to the strong parent brand.
[ to cite ]:
Ernst Primosch, Simon Ineichen, and Arnd Florack (2007) ,"The Effects of Product Scandals on Parent Brands: Linguistic Signatures of a Protective Mechanism", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 353-355.