U.S. Consumers’ Cultural Choices: the Interplay of Ethnocentrism and Global Openness

Dale Russell, INSEAD, France
Global-openness reflects a willingness to interact with foreign people and cultures, including cultural products. Ethnocentrism is a psychosocial construct depicting the proclivity for individuals to view their own group as superior and to reject that which is culturally dissimilar. The extant research suggests that ethnocentrism should be positively related to consumption of domestic movies whereas global-openness should be positively related to consumption of and desire for watching foreign movies. Data collected from a sample of U.S. moviegoers are used to test these propositions and gather insights into U.S. consumers’ cultural choices.
[ to cite ]:
Dale Russell (2007) ,"U.S. Consumers’ Cultural Choices: the Interplay of Ethnocentrism and Global Openness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 330-332.