Does Knowledge of the Marketplace Really Help Consumers? the Case For (Or Against) Persuasion Knowledge

Session Chair: Christina L. Brown, The Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan
Discussion Leader: Ian Skurnik, The University of Toronto

Vigilance Against Perceived Manipulation:

The Effect of Regulatory Focus on the Use of Persuasion Knowledge

 

Amna Kirmani, Southern Methodist University

Rui Zhu, Rice University

 

We demonstrate that individuals' regulatory focus interacts with the accessibility of manipulative intent in message cues to influence the activation of persuasion knowledge, which, in turn, affects brand evaluation. Specifically, promotion-focused individuals are likely to activate persuasion knowledge only in the presence of cues that make manipulative intent highly accessible. In contrast, prevention-focused individuals are likely to activate persuasion knowledge in the presence of cues that make manipulative intent either highly or moderately accessible. However, when ad cues reassure prevention-focused individuals that they are not being duped, they will respond positively.

 

Fortification or Trojan Horse?

The Impact of Warnings on the Effectiveness of Product Placements

 

Margaret C. Campbell, University of Colorado-Boulder

Peeter W. J. Verlegh, Erasmus University Rotterdam

 Gina E. Slejko, University of Colorado-Boulder

 

Both researchers and policy makers have a long standing interest in the ability of (fore)warnings to protect consumers from unwanted persuasion. Recently, policy makers, advertisers and consumer advocacy groups have engaged in a lively debate about the use of warnings in the context of product placements. Drawing on persuasion knowledge, our research examines how pre- and post-warnings impact the effectiveness of product placements. We find differential effects for these two types of warnings on brand recall and brand attitude, and show that sometimes warnings may increase rather than decrease the effects of product placements.

 

The Logic of the Marketplace:

How Consumers Use Metacognitive Skills to Process Brand Claims

 

Christina L. Brown

The Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan

 

Can consumers reason better in marketing situations? Do they draw on domain-specific metacognitive skills to do so, or do they merely invoke a general reasoning ability? In two studies, I adapt the Wason four-card selection task to an advertising context. Results show that a conditional claim (“If it’s Angelo’s, it’s got to be authentic Italian food”) believed to be an ad (vs. word of mouth) evokes an advertising-specific “cheater detection” rule, but not more information search or a generalized reasoning ability. The truth of brand claims was correctly learned only when advertising claims were presented in straightforward order.
[ to cite ]:
Session Chair: Christina L. Brown and Discussion Leader: Ian Skurnik (2006) ,"Does Knowledge of the Marketplace Really Help Consumers? the Case For (Or Against) Persuasion Knowledge", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 519-519.