The Effects of Line Extensions Up and Down in Quality on Initial Choice and Subsequent Switching Tendencies

Timothy Heath, Miami University
Michael McCarthy, Miami University
Subimal Chatterjee, Binghamton University

The Effects of Line Extensions Up and Down in Quality on

Initial Choice and Subsequent Switching Tendencies

 

Timothy B. Heath

Miami University

 

Michael S. McCarthy

Miami Universitiy

 

Subimal Chatterjee

Binghamton University

 

Three experiments compared line extensions with novel names.  Higher-quality extensions (e.g., Formaggio’s Magnifico pasta sauce) failed to increase choice of higher-quality versions, but did increase choice of within-family middle-quality versions (e.g., Formaggio’s regular) at the expense of competitors, steal (when discounted) more people from competitors, and reduce switching to (discounted) competitors.  No corresponding effects of lower-quality extensions emerged, though results implicate countervailing positive effects of more products offered and negative effects of lower-quality offerings.
[ to cite ]:
Timothy Heath, Michael McCarthy, and Subimal Chatterjee (2006) ,"The Effects of Line Extensions Up and Down in Quality on Initial Choice and Subsequent Switching Tendencies", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 75-75.