The Devil You Know: Effects of Suspicion of an Information Source's Identity

Jodie L. Ferguson, Georgia State University, doctoral student
Pam Scholder Ellen, Georgia State University

 The Devil You Know:

Effects of Suspicion of an Information Source’s Identity 

 

Jodie L. Ferguson

J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Georgia State University
 

Pam Scholder Ellen

J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Georgia State University

 

The proliferation of the Internet provides a new integrated forum for consumers’ search activities and decision making.  This new environment, especially consumer boards and chatrooms, may make it difficult for consumers to assess self-interest.  A preliminary study finds consumers less likely to use a chatroom source in making a buying decision than a salesperson in the store, another customer’s testimonial, and an online buying guide.  Suspicions of the credibility of the source and the possibility of an imposter marketer provide some clues as to why a seemingly trustworthy, non-marketer source would be viewed more negatively than a known marketer source.
[ to cite ]:
Jodie L. Ferguson and Pam Scholder Ellen (2006) ,"The Devil You Know: Effects of Suspicion of an Information Source's Identity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 273-274.