The Principle Matters: Antecedents and Consequences of Procedural Justice in the Context of Pricing

Laurence Ashworth, Queen's University
Peter Darke, University of British Columbia

The Principle Matters: Antecedents and Consequences of Procedural Justice in the Context of Pricing

 

Laurence Ashworth, Queen’s University

Peter R. Darke, University of British Columbia

 

Much of the existing work on fairness in pricing focuses on elements of the purchase related to distributive justice, including reference prices and comparisons to other customers’ outcomes.  The current paper builds on this work by examining the role of procedural justice in determining the fairness of purchases.  Two experiments demonstrate that procedural justice is a distinct source of fairness that stems from the violation of prescriptive norms that dictate socially appropriate ways in which marketers should treat consumers.  It is shown that violations of these norms lead to procedural injustice, lowering overall fairness even when consumers’ outcomes are unaffected.
[ to cite ]:
Laurence Ashworth and Peter Darke (2006) ,"The Principle Matters: Antecedents and Consequences of Procedural Justice in the Context of Pricing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 236-236.