In Search of Kinship: Within Group Deviation in Print Advertisements

Tracy Harmon, University of South Florida

Identifying the Black Sheep From the Ordinary: Social Categorization and Within Group Deviation in Print Advertisements

Tracy R. Harmon

University of South Florida

 

The present study employs an extension of ingroup favoritism, using the black sheep hypothesis where subjects judge likable ingroup members more positively than similar outgroup members, while judging unlikable ingroup members more negatively than similar outgroup members. Positioned in an advertising context, this empirical study provides evidence of both ingroup favoritism and within group derogation of unlikable ingroup members. The evidence suggests that the recipient’s overall evaluation of the advertisement is mediated by the spokesperson’s similarity to the recipient and general likeability.
[ to cite ]:
Tracy Harmon (2006) ,"In Search of Kinship: Within Group Deviation in Print Advertisements", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 278-279.