Why Feelings Stray: Affective Misforecasting Drivers of Consumer Satisfaction

Vanessa M. Patrick Deborah J. MacInnis,

Why Feelings Stray:

Affective Misforecasting Drivers of Consumer Satisfaction

 

Vanessa M. Patrick (University of Georgia)

Deborah J.  MacInnis (University of Southern California)

 

       While experienced affect has been identified as a predictor of consumer satisfaction, limited research has examined how affective misforecasting (AMF) —the gap between predicted and experienced affect impacts satisfaction judgments. Based on prior research that links AMF and satisfaction, the current study uses qualitative and quantitative data to examine the sources of AMF (i.e., why it occurs) in the consumption domain. The authors find evidence supporting some sources of AMF identified in the psychology literature, develop a fuller understanding of others, and, find evidence for novel sources of AMF not previously explored. Importantly, they find considerable differences in the sources of AMF depending on whether feelings are worse than or better than forecast.
[ to cite ]:
Vanessa M. Patrick Deborah J. MacInnis (2006) ,"Why Feelings Stray: Affective Misforecasting Drivers of Consumer Satisfaction", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 49-56.