The Mcdonaldization of Enchantment and Consumers Practices of Re-Enchantment: a Dialectic View of Transformative Consumption

Christian Jantzen Aalborg University, Department of Communication Rob Kozinets, University of Wisconsin, Department of Marketing rkozinets@bus.wisc.edu Per Ostergaard University of Southern Denmark, Department of Marketing John Sherry Nor

Is Re-Enchantment just Enchantment?: Towards an Understanding of a Second order Enchantment

 

Per Ostergaard

University of Southern Denmark, Department of Marketing

 

Christian Jantzen

Aalborg University, Department of Communication

 

Ritzer’s (2005) proposals for re-enchanting a disenchanted world are grounded in Weber’s (2001) arguments about the rationalization of the western world. Ritzer makes a direct comparison between the cathedrals of consumption and the cathedrals associated with organised religions. The enchantment in pre-capitalistic era is presumed to be quite similar to enchantment today. Is this comparison historically viable? We investigate this question through the lens of Baudrillard’s (1993) writings on simulation and simulacra.

 

Politicized Consumption Community and Consumers’ Practices of Enchantment

 

Craig Thompson

Gokcen Coskuner

University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Marketing

 

This study analyzes a politicized form of consumption community in order to extend

theoretical understanding of the enchantment-disenchantment dialectic. Community Supported Agriculture is a system of shared risk and consumer involvement (and commitment) quite distinct from conventional channels of food distribution. By vesting consumers in a specific organic farm and by encouraging consumers to get closer to the land, the CSA model immerses consumers in a world of unpredictability, surprise, and spontaneity that is quite conducive to experiences of re-enchantment.

 

New Religions, Temple Burns, and the Re-enchantment of Belief 

 

Robert V. Kozinets

York University, Department of Marketing

 

John F. Sherry, Jr.

University of Notre Dame, Department of Marketing

 

This study depicts the grassroots, themed, creative behavior of consumers at a popular American anti-market festival and analyzes them as ritualistic and touristic processes that decommodify, resacralize, authenticate, and reenchant the processes of belief and meaning-making that have most commonly been provided by organized religions. Although the Burning Man festival has been explored as an autonomous zone of self-expressive communal and social regeneration, the significance of its sacred dimensions holds insights for consumer researchers interested in exploring meaning-making, authenticity, the sacred and reenchantment in contemporary religious expression.
[ to cite ]:
Christian Jantzen Aalborg University (2006) ,"The Mcdonaldization of Enchantment and Consumers Practices of Re-Enchantment: a Dialectic View of Transformative Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 352-354.