A Blind Mind's Eye: Perceptual Defense Mechanisms and Aschematic Visual Information

S. Adam Brasel, Boston College
Philip Zimbardo, Stanford University
George Slavich, University of Oregon

A Blind Mind’s Eye: Perceptual Defense Mechanisms and Aschematic Visual Information

 

S. Adam Brasel, Boston College

Philip Zimbardo, Stanford University

George Slavich, University of Oregon

 

This research reports on an eyetracker experiment exploring aschematic perception in visual processing. While eighty percent of those exposed to an urban image containing a woman committing suicide fixated on the woman, only thirty-five percent reported seeing her. Another thirty-five percent reported schema consistent items in her place and were three times as likely to insert other false schematic items into image recall. Schematic responders were also partially protected from the negative affect the image created. These findings suggest that people ignore aschematic stimuli due to top-down cognitive frameworks that transform images between sight and memory, rather than changing the visual search pattern itself.
[ to cite ]:
S. Adam Brasel, Philip Zimbardo, and George Slavich (2006) ,"A Blind Mind's Eye: Perceptual Defense Mechanisms and Aschematic Visual Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 305-305.