When Choosing Is Not Deciding: the Effect of Perceived Responsibility on Choice Outcome Satisfaction

Simona Botti, Cornell University
Ann L. McGill, University of Chicago

When Choosing Is Not Deciding: The Effect of Perceived Responsibility on Choice Outcome Satisfaction

Simona Botti

Cornell University

Ann L. McGill

University of Chicago

 

Prior research has found differences in satisfaction for choosers and non-choosers of the same outcome. Two studies show that differentiability of the choice set options moderates this effect. When options are more differentiated choice enhances satisfaction in positively-valenced choice contexts and dissatisfaction in negatively-valenced choice contexts, but when options are less differentiated choosers experience the same level of satisfaction as non-choosers. We test the hypothesis that the effect of outcome differentiability is due to differences in perceived level of responsibility and subsequent self-credit and self-blame for the decision outcome. A third study separates the effects of differentiability from random choice.
[ to cite ]:
Simona Botti and Ann L. McGill (2006) ,"When Choosing Is Not Deciding: the Effect of Perceived Responsibility on Choice Outcome Satisfaction", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 512-513.