14-D: Consumer Reactance to Persuasive Messages: How Personal Preferences Influence Attitude and Attitude Change

Sabrina Lucke, Technical University of Munich, Germany
Joerg Koenigstorfer, Technical University of Munich, Germany
Angela Y. Lee, Northwestern University, USA
Consumer preferences, that is, in our study, consumers’ affiliation with the sender of a message, drive not only immediate reactance to persuasion when there is a mismatch between the sender and own preferences, but also a delayed increase in attitude. Negative (partly positive) emotions mediate the process.
[ to cite ]:
Sabrina Lucke, Joerg Koenigstorfer, and Angela Y. Lee (2017) ,"14-D: Consumer Reactance to Persuasive Messages: How Personal Preferences Influence Attitude and Attitude Change", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1047-1047.