10-B: Do You Feel Like a Fraud? How Experiencing the Impostor Phenomenon Influences Consumption Choices

Emily Goldsmith, Marymount Manhattan College, USA
Stephen Gould, Baruch College, USA
Most people occasionally feel like a fraud. Usually we overcome these feelings by acknowledging why we deserve our accomplishments. There are times when, despite all external evidence, we feel like an impostor. We propose that a person experiencing the impostor phenomenon prefers products that allow them to hide fraudulent feelings.
[ to cite ]:
Emily Goldsmith and Stephen Gould (2017) ,"10-B: Do You Feel Like a Fraud? How Experiencing the Impostor Phenomenon Influences Consumption Choices", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1029-1029.