Getting in Touch With Your Thinking Style: How Touchscreens Influence Purchase

Ying Zhu, University of British Columbia, Canada
Jeffrey Meyer, Bowling Green State University, U.S.A
We demonstrate that consumers’ purchase intentions toward utilitarian and hedonic products differ, depending on the device used. When consumers use a touchscreen device (vs. a desktop), purchase intentions are higher for hedonic products but lower for utilitarian products. Situation-specific thinking style is shown to be an underlying mechanism.
[ to cite ]:
Ying Zhu and Jeffrey Meyer (2016) ,"Getting in Touch With Your Thinking Style: How Touchscreens Influence Purchase", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau and Stefano Puntoni, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 704-705.