The Effect of Bicultural Identity on Consumer Preference

JungHwa Hong, University of Texas at Tyler
Chien-Wei Lin, State University of New York at Oneonta
Two studies reveal that biculturals introject (i.e., rely on others’ preferences to gauge their own) less than individuals with single identity. Further, such effect is moderated by low (vs. high) cultural identity integration. There is no difference on projection (i.e., rely on own preferences to estimate others).
[ to cite ]:
JungHwa Hong and Chien-Wei Lin (2015) ,"The Effect of Bicultural Identity on Consumer Preference ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl and Carolyn Yoon, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 789-789.