Beyond Skepticism: Can Accessing Persuasion Knowledge Bolster Credibility?

Mathew S. Isaac, Seattle University, USA
Kent Grayson, Northwestern University, USA
Most persuasion knowledge research has shown that persuasion knowledge access is associated with skepticism. In contrast, we demonstrate that persuasion knowledge access can lead to greater credibility (rather than skepticism), and that high (vs. low) persuasion knowledge access can sometimes bolster evaluations of a persuasive agent and its offering.
[ to cite ]:
Mathew S. Isaac and Kent Grayson (2015) ," Beyond Skepticism: Can Accessing Persuasion Knowledge Bolster Credibility?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl and Carolyn Yoon, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 570-571.