Prosocial Incentives: Limits and Benefits of Working For Others

Alex Imas, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Elizabeth Keenan, University of California San Diego, USA
Ayelet Gneezy, University of California San Diego, USA
Using a combination of lab and field experiments, we demonstrate that prosocial incentives, where effort is tied directly to charitable contributions, can be more effective in motivating effort and participation than standard self-benefiting incentives. Prosocial incentives are particularly effective when stakes are low and decisions are made public.
[ to cite ]:
Alex Imas, Elizabeth Keenan, and Ayelet Gneezy (2015) ,"Prosocial Incentives: Limits and Benefits of Working For Others", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl and Carolyn Yoon, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 170-175.