The Informational Value of Dissimilarity in Interpersonal Influence

Mirjam Tuk, Imperial College London, United Kingdom & Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Peeter Verlegh, VU Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Ale Smidts, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Daniel Wigboldus, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
We show that advisees don't discount advice received from dissimilar advisors, but use this as information based on which they infer more general dissimilarity, including in the advice domain. Consequently, consumers contrast their opinions and choices away from those of dissimilar advisors. We show the cognitive nature of this process.
[ to cite ]:
Mirjam Tuk, Peeter Verlegh, Ale Smidts, and Daniel Wigboldus (2015) ,"The Informational Value of Dissimilarity in Interpersonal Influence", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl and Carolyn Yoon, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 723-724.