Pain and Preferences: the Impact of Other’S Decisional Conflict on Our Own Preferences

Rom Schrift, The Wharton School, USA
Moty Amar, Ono Academic College, Israel
How does observing someone else’s pain and agony over an impending decision impact our own preferences when facing similar choice? Will we tend to choose more similarly or differently? In this paper we find that observing other’s decisional-conflict triggers empathic reactions and sense of shared identity that engender preference convergence.
[ to cite ]:
Rom Schrift and Moty Amar (2015) ,"Pain and Preferences: the Impact of Other’S Decisional Conflict on Our Own Preferences", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl and Carolyn Yoon, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 682-683.