Questioning the End Effect: Endings Do Not Inherently Have a Disproportionate Impact on Evaluations of Experiences

Stephanie M. Tully, University of Southern California, USA
Tom Meyvis, New York University, USA
This research re-examines the end effect, which suggests that people’s retrospective evaluations are disproportionately influenced by the end of the experience. We demonstrate that episodes do not disproportionately affect evaluations simply because they occur at the end. Instead, end effects exist only when additional conditions are met.
[ to cite ]:
Stephanie M. Tully and Tom Meyvis (2015) ,"Questioning the End Effect: Endings Do Not Inherently Have a Disproportionate Impact on Evaluations of Experiences", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl and Carolyn Yoon, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 239-243.