Negative Information and Self-Referencing: Reviving the Sleeper Effect

Adrienne Foos, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Kathleen Keeling, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Debbie Isobel Keeling, Loughboroug University, United Kingdom
This research examines the potential for negative information and self-referencing to influence persuasion. It is predicted that the order of positive/negative message presentation and self-referencing impact the sleeper effect. The first experiment supports the significance of ordering, and the second suggests the importance of further research of self structures.
[ to cite ]:
Adrienne Foos, Kathleen Keeling, and Debbie Isobel Keeling (2014) ,"Negative Information and Self-Referencing: Reviving the Sleeper Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte and Stacy Wood, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 784-784.