Doing It the Hard Way: Low Personal Control Drives Preference For High-Effort Products

Keisha M. Cutright, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Adriana Samper, Arizona State University, USA
Despite the common notion that ‘easier=better,’ across five studies we demonstrate that low feelings of control lead consumers to reject products where little personal effort is required in favor of products where high personal effort is required to achieve the same outcome. Seemingly irrational, such choices restore feelings of control.
[ to cite ]:
Keisha M. Cutright and Adriana Samper (2013) ,"Doing It the Hard Way: Low Personal Control Drives Preference For High-Effort Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.