Omission Bias in the Marketplace: the Moderating Role of Experience on Consumer Trust Perceptions For Brands and Agents

Jungim Mun, SUNY at Buffalo, USA
Michael Wiles, Arizona State University, USA
Charles D. Lindsey, SUNY at Buffalo, USA
Two types of marketplace behaviors may result in harm to consumers. Commissions are harmful actions such as inaccurately reporting important marketplace information, whereas omissions are harmful inactions such as failing to report important marketplace information. The current research integrates procedural justice theory and attribution theory to predict that for harmful omissions, experienced marketplace actors (e.g., brands, salespersons) will suffer greater decreases in trust perceptions than inexperienced marketplace actors. In contrast, for harmful commissions, actor experience is predicted to have no influence on decreases in trust perceptions.
[ to cite ]:
Jungim Mun, Michael Wiles, and Charles D. Lindsey (2013) ,"Omission Bias in the Marketplace: the Moderating Role of Experience on Consumer Trust Perceptions For Brands and Agents", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.