How Incidental Affect Alters Subsequent Judgments: Insights From a Human Fmri Study

Hilke Plassmann, INSEAD, France
Beth Pavlicek, Ecole des Neurosciences de Paris, France
Baba Shiv, Stanford University, USA
Incidental affect prior to the consumption influences the evaluation of the consumed good, but the processes subserving this incidental reward effect is not well understood. We find that behavioral responses support “affect-as-information” theories, but the neural data find evidence for an affect regulation hypothesis.
[ to cite ]:
Hilke Plassmann, Beth Pavlicek, and Baba Shiv (2012) ,"How Incidental Affect Alters Subsequent Judgments: Insights From a Human Fmri Study", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 158-162.