Good Or Bad, We Want It Now: Resolution Theory Explains Magnitude Reversal in Intertemporal Choice

David Hardisty, Stanford University, USA
Kirstin Appelt, Columbia University, USA
Elke Weber, Columbia University, USA
Across four studies, outcome magnitude has opposite effects on intertemporal choice for gains and losses: consumers discount small gains more than large gains, but discount small losses less than large losses. Thought listings show that this is mediated by consumers' desire to resolve gains and losses as soon as possible.
[ to cite ]:
David Hardisty, Kirstin Appelt, and Elke Weber (2012) ,"Good Or Bad, We Want It Now: Resolution Theory Explains Magnitude Reversal in Intertemporal Choice", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep G├╝rhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 991-992.