Infectious Counterfeiting: Labeling Products As Fakes Can Contaminate Perceived & Actual Efficacy

Moty Amar, OAC, Israel
Ziv Carmon, INSEAD, Singapore
Dan Ariely, Duke University, USA
We show that counterfeiting can infect perceived- and actual-quality of counterfeit as well as of non-fake versions of products. For example, experienced golfers played objectively worse with a (non-fake) club said to be a counterfeit versus with a non-fake club. We show that assessments of ethical offense mediated the effect.
[ to cite ]:
Moty Amar, Ziv Carmon, and Dan Ariely (2012) ,"Infectious Counterfeiting: Labeling Products As Fakes Can Contaminate Perceived & Actual Efficacy", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep G├╝rhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 962-963.