The Countability Effect: Comparative Versus Experiential Reactions to Reward Distributions

Jingjing Ma, Northwestern University, USA
Neal Roese, Northwestern University, USA
The under-benefited are usually less satisfied than the over-benefited in reward distributions. However, we show that the countability of rewards moderates this effect: when rewards cannot be counted in numerical terms, the under-benefited are just as satisfied as the over-benefited. Comparative versus experiential cognitive focus may be the underlying mechanism.
[ to cite ]:
Jingjing Ma and Neal Roese (2012) ,"The Countability Effect: Comparative Versus Experiential Reactions to Reward Distributions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep G├╝rhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 106-111.