Taking Advantage of Real and Perceived Differences Between Material and Experiential Purchases

Travis Carter, University of Chicago, USA
Emily Rosenzweig, Cornell University, USA
Thomas Gilovich, Cornell University, USA
There appear to be genuine benefits to choosing experiences over possessions. But how different are the categories really? Empirical evidence suggests that the categories are real, but with fuzzy boundaries. That ambiguity can be exploited, illuminating the categories’ underlying properties, and providing the benefits of experiences to consumers.
[ to cite ]:
Travis Carter, Emily Rosenzweig, and Thomas Gilovich (2012) ,"Taking Advantage of Real and Perceived Differences Between Material and Experiential Purchases", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 106-111.