Helping Others Or Oneself: How Incidental Social Comparisons Affect Prosocial Behavior

Ann Schlosser, University of Washington, USA
Eric Levy, Cambridge University, UK
Word-of-mouth. Line queues. Performance feedback. These are a few common situations that provide comparative information of being better or worse off than others. We propose and find in four studies that by affecting individuals’ general sense of personal accomplishment, such social comparison situations can affect individuals' propensity to be charitable.
[ to cite ]:
Ann Schlosser and Eric Levy (2012) ,"Helping Others Or Oneself: How Incidental Social Comparisons Affect Prosocial Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 620-621.