That Tastes Awful, Unless I Hear It Tastes Good: the Impact of Informational Social Influence on Conflicting Evaluations

Andrew Bryant, The George Washington University, USA
Kashef Majid, The George Washington University, USA
Vanessa Perry, The George Washington University, USA
In today’s marketplace consumers are becoming increasingly reliant on the judgments of others in order to form their evaluations. Our study explores the interplay between informational social influence and evaluations of products. The findings suggest that a relatively unpleasant product can be given a more favorable evaluation when consumers are made aware that other consumers had previously evaluated the product favorably.
[ to cite ]:
Andrew Bryant, Kashef Majid, and Vanessa Perry (2011) ,"That Tastes Awful, Unless I Hear It Tastes Good: the Impact of Informational Social Influence on Conflicting Evaluations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 824-825.