Goal Monitoring: Does One Step Forward Seem Larger Than One Step Back?

Margaret C. Campbell, University of Colorado, USA
Caleb Warren, Bocconi University, Italy
Consumers perceive that goal-consistent behaviors, like saving $30 or foregoing a dessert, help goal progress more than objectively equivalent goal-inconsistent behaviors, like spending $30 or eating a dessert, hurt it. Moreover, this tendency to overweight the impact of goal-consistent relative to goal-inconsistent behaviors is negatively associated with goal attainment.
[ to cite ]:
Margaret C. Campbell and Caleb Warren (2011) ,"Goal Monitoring: Does One Step Forward Seem Larger Than One Step Back?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 156-157.