I Can Almost Taste It Now: Tracking the Neural Effects of Anticipatory Delays on Consumption

Uma Karmarker, Stanford University, USA
Hilke Plassmann, INSEAD, France
Baba Shiv, Stanford University, USA
Antonio Rangel, California Institute of Technology, USA
Using fMRI while participants tasted appetitive and aversive liquids, we find that the neural circuitry related to experienced reward processing is more active during consumption after shorter rather than longer anticipatory delays. This suggests that the hedonic impact of consumption is weakened by the length of the anticipatory delays.
[ to cite ]:
Uma Karmarker, Hilke Plassmann, Baba Shiv, and Antonio Rangel (2011) ,"I Can Almost Taste It Now: Tracking the Neural Effects of Anticipatory Delays on Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 138-139.