You’Re Shady: the Effect of Pupil Obscuration on Consumers’ Perceived Trust

Hamed Aghakhani, University of Manitoba, Canada
Kelley Main, University of Manitoba, Canada
Nick Turner, University of Manitoba, Canada
This research examines the impact of pupil obscuration on consumers’ perceived trust. In two experiments, it is found that people have higher trust in a person who has no obscuration and this trust decreases as the darkness of the lenses increases. The findings also show that even indirect eye gazing with clear glasses, typically associated with lower trust, has higher trust as compared with shaded glasses. The status of the person with the shaded glasses moderates this effect on perceived trust.
[ to cite ]:
Hamed Aghakhani, Kelley Main, and Nick Turner (2011) ,"You’Re Shady: the Effect of Pupil Obscuration on Consumers’ Perceived Trust", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 788-789.