Affect, Cognition, and Consumer Charity: the Moderating Role of Social Distance

Joseph Paniculangara, University of Central Florida, USA
Xin He, University of Central Florida, USA
This paper demonstrates that affect and cognition interact with social distance between donor and recipient, resulting in differences in donation. Affect-driven donors are motivated by a consummatory goal of increasing “warm glow” utility, which occurs irrespective of social distance. However, cognition-driven donors are motivated by an instrumental goal of donating to a cause from which they derive utility, which is lessened by increasing social distance. Three experiments show support for the processing mode by social distance interaction. In the third experiment, a novel donation of extra credit points by student participants (time) results in similar effects as donation of money.
[ to cite ]:
Joseph Paniculangara and Xin He (2011) ,"Affect, Cognition, and Consumer Charity: the Moderating Role of Social Distance", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 773-774.