The Influence of Framing and Processing Fluency on the Estimates of Conjunctive Events

Ahmad Daryanto, Lancaster University, UK
Peter Hampson, Northumbria University, UK
Many events in life constitute conjunctive events (e.g., getting tenure). A conjunctive event consists of more than a simple event (e.g., getting a paper published). The likelihood of a conjunctive event is the probability that all simple events occur. Past research has examined how people interpret the probability occurence of the conjunctive events (e.g., Bar-Hillel, 1972; Brockner et al. 2002; Mandel, 2008). For instance, Bar Hillel (1973) has found that people overestimate the likelihood of conjunctive events. Research by Brockner et al. (2002) demonstrates that promotion-focused individuals may do better at estimating conjunctive events than prevention-focused individuals. The present research aims at extending the previous research. We posit that estimates of a conjunctive event may be affected by the framing of its simple events (i.e., gain e.g., accepted vs. loss, e.g., not rejected) and the effect is mediated by processing fluency. We aim at making contribution to framing and consumer decision making literature
[ to cite ]:
Ahmad Daryanto and Peter Hampson (2011) ,"The Influence of Framing and Processing Fluency on the Estimates of Conjunctive Events", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 731-732.