Walking the Talk,Talking the Walk: Embodied Health Activism in Developing Nations

Ingeborg Kleppe, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Nor way
Marylouise Caldwell, University of Sydney
How do people with HIV/Aids in developing nations become public spokes-models and activists who convince other consumers to adopt Positive Living, a radical consumption lifestyle? We find consumers undergo a radical self-transformation so as to qualify to become spoke-models/activists. This transformation process is characterised by a normalisation process comprising three phases: Facing the Worst which reflects from stories of denial, concealment and delayed testing. Walking the Talk includes developing lay expertise, dealing with stigma, and embodying the principles of Positive Living. Talking the Walk includes extending oneself beyond personal concerns and pursuing broad social purposes. HIV/Aids activists must temper their radicalism and learn to deal with multiple players in a highly socio-politicised contested field.
[ to cite ]:
Ingeborg Kleppe and Marylouise Caldwell (2011) ,"Walking the Talk,Talking the Walk: Embodied Health Activism in Developing Nations ", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 310-315.